News


WEST COAST INITIATIVES FROM THE IMPULSES OF RUDOLF STEINER

, November 18, 2017

Snapshots from “EverythingFlows”,  A Water Conference held in North Vancouver BC at Cascadia in September 2017 Jennifer Greene opened the conference by showing us her many-times-taped-together copy of “Sensitive Chaos: The Creation of Flowing Forms in Water and Air” by Theodor Schwenk, an anthroposophist, engineer and pioneering water researcher who founded the Institute for Flow Sciences in Germany. She carries this volume around with her wherever she goes, calling it her “book of mysteries.” Jennifer continues Schwenk’s work at the Water Research Institute located in Blue Hill, Maine. “Everything about water registers in a single drop,” she said. We each made one with a syringe and then “grew” it and observed what changed and what remained the same. She asked, “What can we say about the intrinsic nature of water?” We noticed among other things that the drop was round and silvery and it quivered. We took a drop...

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Meditation with Robin Schmidt – by Paul Hodgkins and Susan Richard

, September 13, 2017

On Saturday, August 19, 2017, approximately forty people attended a day-long workshop on the practice of anthroposophical meditation, led by Robin Schmidt. Robin co-authored, with Heinz Zimmerman, a book on this topic, and his teachings on the workshop day were mostly based on the content of his book, Meditation. If you were not able to attend the workshop, you may learn a great deal about the practice of anthroposophical meditation by reading the book, which is available through the Anthroposophical Society in Canada. You can order it on the website. Robin’s presentation was very organized, clear, and thorough. He began by placing anthroposophical meditation firmly in the stream of European modernity, into which three ideas, consisting of infinity, eternity, and autonomy, flow. These ideas became impulses which gave rise to modern science and thinking; they were taken up by the Rosicrucians in a more spiritual way. The Rosicrucians recognised...

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U.lab, Leading from the Emerging Future

, September 13, 2017

  For a number of years now, I have been engaged with “Theory U”, a methodology, a framework, a process, that helps individuals and groups access a deeper level of awareness, and acting from this deeper source, create and find solutions not based on patterns of the past, but on emerging future possibilities. The roots of “Theory U” go back to the 1960s and the NPI (Netherlands Pedagogical Institute) founded by Bernard Lievegoed. It was developed in its present form by C. Otto Scharmer, senior lecturer at MIT. “Theory U” is a growing dynamic method of leadership development that is used to bring change in businesses, organizations, and personal lives. When I first came across this work, I was astounded to find deep roots in anthroposophy, in a language that was accessible to everyone. Starting in September, there is a free on-line course: u.lab, Leading from the Emerging Future....

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Cascadia Reaches Out – by Susan Koppersmith

, July 11, 2017

Karl Koenig (1902-1966) was an Austrian paediatrician who founded the worldwide Camphill movement of therapeutic communities for those with special needs. Ita Wegman, an Anthroposophic physician, invited him to work closely with her at her institute for people with disabilities. The Cascadia Society for Social Working is an urban Camphill centre in North Vancouver BC with a day program serving 34 individuals with developmental disabilities. In addition 11 of these individuals live in 4 Cascadia residences located in close proximity to each other.   Cascadia’s Main House   Workshops in the day centre include fibre arts, painting, basketry, candle-making, gardening, clay and home skills as well as a myriad of other artistic, educational, and therapeutic activities. Eurythmy and music play a strong part in the life of Cascadia. I had several meetings with Ruth Tschannen, a therapeutic Eurythmist, who has spent 30 years in Camphill communities. She has been a...

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The Land of the Heart

, March 11, 2017

The second part of a message from Helga Natoli from Greece through the good offices of Ingrid Krause Athens, 14th of November 2016 In Athens, in a section of the Ellinikos old airport – to be exact – live 300 refugee children from Afghanistan, aged 1 to 18. Their shelter is an abandoned building, the former arrivals terminal, now unused and left to fall apart for more than a decade. In July 2016 there were 2000 people living in this building, of which around 900 were children. Many have left since, having found better shelters for themselves. Some really lucky ones might have crossed borders and been awarded asylum in other European countries. Yet the ones that remain, live in tents for over a year now, on the upper floor of this building. An external rusted metallic staircase takes them down to what once was the parking lot of the airport… broken glass, cement, rubbish and...

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Waldorf comes to a refugee camp in Greece

, January 10, 2017

Ingrid Krause, a member of the Anthroposophical Society who lives in Quebec, has recently returned from Greece. This is a country she knows well, having explored it for the first time on a motor bike shortly after completing her studies in Germany. Since retiring, she has gone back again five times. “Greece welcomes me like a sister soul with the uplifting radiance of her sky, the brilliant blue of her sea which causes the melancholy heart to rejoice, and the warmth and friendliness of her people.” She owns some plot on the island of Cythera where “I share the land with wild mountain goats on hills fragrant with the scent of thyme and sage set against a backdrop of the blue sea.” The scene is however far less pastoral in Athens, where this fall she visited the Ellinikos refugee camp. The people there are among the thousands of migrants...

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